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Plant your seed, watch it grow.

Nami Plant App
UI/UX
An app for all the green thumbs and plant moms who want to watch their garden grow.
Category
UI/UX
Deliverables
Branding, personas, app user flows, mid-fidelity wireframes,
high-fidelity wireframes, prototype
credits
Sean Bacon, Bradford Prairie
Overview
Nami is an app that connects to a small water reader to help you take care of your plants and keep them happy. It tracks the soil moisture, creates a customized watering schedule based on the specific plant and its current moisture, and provides tips on how to care for your plants. Nami aims to assist users with a busy lifestyle who have plants, and users who just want to take the proper measures of caring for a plant.
Approach
For this project, I conducted interviews, organized data by affinity mapping, created personas and moodboards, as well as create an app user flow, wireframes, and a prototype. The name "Nami" was rooted from the word "tsunami" as a reference to the idea of water saturating a large area of land. I wanted the interface to be simple and straightforward, with sophisticated shades of green. Some key features included in the app are a soil moisture detector, a customized watering schedule, and care tips that cater to your specific plant—all necessary features that will help your plants grow.
TYPEFACES
COLOR PALETTE
ICONS
personas
Based on my learnings from my research, I created two personas as my target users. My first persona is a new plant mom and my second persona is a meticulous plant owner; I chose to put them into two groups because they have very different needs and considerations.
App user flows
While Nami's purpose is specifically to make caring for  plants easier, it was important to keep the user flow minimal and clean. Considering that the users have a habit of forgetting to water their plants,  Nami's key features are viewing your plant information and a watering schedule.
Flow: onboarding

onboarding prototype

FLow: watering schedule

watering schedule prototype